Not that long ago, in 2004, there were 9,000 Blockbuster locations across the USA. Only one remains today; the last of the chain’s video rental stores stands in Bend, Ore.

Video consumers discovered that increased automation was more attractive. Netflix, Hulu, Redbox, On Demand Video and DVRs thrived. Blockbuster, well, busted.

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The popularity and skyrocketing value of cryptocurrency has created a new cybercrime. It’s called cryptojacking.

According to the Internet Security Threat Report released this spring from Symantec, cryptojacking has become profitable.

“Cryptojacking is a rising threat to cyber and personal security,” Mike Fey, president and COO of Symantec, said in the company’s press release. “The massive profit incentive puts people, devices and organizations at risk of unauthorized coinminers siphoning resources from their systems, further motivating criminals to infiltrate everything from home PCs to giant data centers.”

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The FBI claims that the United States would be safer if the bureau had access to encrypted cellphones during investigations. However, a recent survey by The Washington Post‘s Cybersecurity 202 showed opposition to the FBI’s demand that device and software makers give law enforcement a built-in way to access encrypted data with a warrant. More than 100 digital security experts were surveyed, and 72 percent disagreed with the FBI’s assertion they have a “back door”.

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By Michael D. Weisberg

Few information technology issues are so contentious or divisive as the access by law enforcement to cryptographic keys. The FBI asserts that its inability to access encrypted cellphones during investigations leaves the United States less safe. A recent article in The Washington Post, however, shows that 72 percent of digital security experts surveyed by The Cybersecurity 202 disagree with the FBI. Here is some historical perspective on the debate.

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An Intrusion Detection System (IDS) monitors and analyzes computer network traffic to protect a system from network-based threats. An IDS reads inbound and outbound packets, searching for suspicious patterns. Malicious activity is usually reported to a Security Operations Center (SOC) or a Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) system. The Intrusion Detection System notifies administrators through alerts and sets severity levels. If the IDS is operating in IPS mode, or Intrusion Prevention System mode, it can bar the source IP address from accessing the network.

Here are five reasons why your company might need an Intrusion Detection System:

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